3 min read

News Roundup Week of February 16, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 2/16/18 10:53 AM

Medical Residents Lack Comprehensive Training in Cultural Competency

A report from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) presents data from medical residency and fellowship programs, which shows that clinical learning environments (CLEs) vary widely in their application of strategies to address healthcare disparities. Among other findings, the data demonstrate a lack of comprehensive training in cultural competency.

Topics: Cross-cultural issues Language barriers cancer care health disparities News Roundup cultural competency
4 min read

News Roundup | Week of February 9, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 2/9/18 9:48 AM

Racial Bias Affects Trauma Outcomes

Dr. Adil Haider, a trauma surgeon at Harvard Medical School, has been studying disparities in emergency care outcomes for over 10 years. “People have always had this iconic image of emergency departments as the great equalizers,” Haider says. “There’s a perception that no matter who you are, if you have a trauma injury, you’re going to get picked up and receive the same level of care.” However, Dr. Haider's research identified large gaps in patient survival rates based on race. Compared to white patients with similar injuries, he found that black and Hispanic patients have a 20% and 50% greater chance of death, respectively. Socioeconomic factors, insurance status, and access to immediate emergency care all contribute to this disparity. But unconscious bias is also a likely culprit.

Topics: health disparities unconscious bias News Roundup LGTBQ population cultural competency
5 min read

News Roundup | Week of December 18, 2017

By Megan Bedford on 12/22/17 11:56 AM

Racism May Cause the Loss of Black Infants

In the U.S., black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. According to Arthur James, an OB-GYN at Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University in Columbus, the majority of black infants that die are born premature, because black mothers have a higher risk of early labor. Research has shown that this gap can't be explained by poverty, education, or genetics. Around the world, women of similar economic and genetic histories routinely give birth to healthy, full-term babies. But there's something about growing up black in America that leads African-American mothers to have babies that are comparatively smaller and less healthy.

Topics: health equity unconscious bias LGTBQ population cultural competency maternal mortality

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