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The Next Generation of Cultural Competency Training [Video]

By Andres Escheverri on 12/7/18 10:30 AM

Quality Interactions cultural competency training is better than ever

Great news here at Quality Interactions. Our industry-leading cultural competency training for healthcare organizations just got even better. We've updated and enhanced our popular course catalog, starting with the ResCUE ModelTM for effective cross-cultural interactions. With powerful new features that increase engagement and deepen learning, now is a great time to utilize our proven eLearning courses for your clinical and non-clinical staff.

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Cultural Competency and Chronic Disease

By Georgia Barnes on 11/7/18 9:28 AM

Manage Chronic Disease with the EFST Model for Cultural Competence

How can clinicians help ease the stress of chronic disease? Recent healthcare news stories published in The New York Times draw attention to the incredible burden of serious illness and chronic disease on critically sick patients. Not only are they physically uncomfortable and often fighting for their lives—they are also baffled by a confusing healthcare system and swamped by medical bills. Now imagine adding a language barrier to the mix! The challenges of serious illness are compounded when there are cross-cultural issues at play. Quality Interactions' EFST Model is designed to help clinicians uncover and address these issues and provide culturally-sensitive care to all patients with chronic disease.

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Asked & Answered:12 Questions About Social Determinants of Health

By J. Emilio Carrillo, MD, MPH on 10/12/18 10:03 AM

Our recent live learning event, Social Determinants & Cross-Cultural Care, presented by Dr. Emilio Carrillo, explored the history and impact of social determinants of health (SODH) and presented real-world case studies to show how health practitioners can make a real difference to improve patient health outcomes. Here are the answers to questions submitted by participants that Dr. Carrillo did not have time to answer during the event. You can also access the event slides and recording.

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Border Walls: Cultural Competency and the Hispanic/Latino Population

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 10/4/18 4:22 PM




In the 1990s, before I started my second year of medical school at University of California, San Diego (just 30 minutes north of the Mexican border) I made a decision that would change my life. The second-year curriculum allowed for a number of elective courses. We were supposed to select from a catalogue of options—radiology, advanced anatomy, medical ethics, and many others. Most students chose two per semester. I chose one that spanned the entire year: Medical Spanish.

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Social Determinants of Health: Taking Action in a Clinical Setting

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 8/16/18 10:30 AM

How clinicians can address social determinants of health

We have known for decades that income, education, race, gender, and other social factors have a bigger impact than medical care on people’s health and life expectancy. Social determinants of health (SODH) are well documented by respected organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO).

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Cultural Competency and Value-Based Care

By Megan Bedford on 8/1/18 8:44 AM

 

The U.S. spends more on healthcare than any other country. Yet we struggle with healthcare access and quality, and our overall population is less healthy than other developed nations. One possible solution to this problem is value-based care. This article provides an overview of value-based care models and shows how cultural competency training is essential for doctors and healthcare organizations to provide high-value care for patients. 

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Real Talk: Reimagining the Role of Medical Interpreters

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 7/3/18 9:45 AM

This content was originally presented as part of our live learning event, "Expanding the Role of Interpreters in a Value-Based System," by Dr. Alexander Green. View the recorded event here.

As a primary care physician, I take care of a large Spanish-speaking population, among other culturally and socioeconomically diverse patients. I’m fluent in medical Spanish and communicate directly with my Spanish-speaking patients. But regardless of whether I’m speaking Spanish or working with a medical interpreter, visits with limited English proficiency (LEP) patients always leave me with a worried feeling in the pit of my stomach. I’m keenly aware that most healthcare takes place outside of the doctor’s office, and this is where LEP patients fall through the cracks. I wonder, “Did Mrs. Ramirez really understand how to prep for her colonoscopy next week?” or “Was Mr. Luan actually convinced that he needs to take the medication I prescribed for his diabetes?”

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News Roundup | Week of June 15, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 6/15/18 4:02 PM

Why Being Black in America is Bad for Your Health

After more than a year of in-depth reporting in Baltimore, The Atlantic has published a long read that explores why, as a group, black Americans are significantly less healthy than white Americans. The piece follows a woman named Kairra, who is 27, black, very overweight, and suffers from a host of health problems that are usually associated with people three times her age. In Baltimore, as well as other segregated cities like Chicago and Philadelphia, the low-income, mostly black neighborhoods have a life expectancy that is 20 years lower than more affluent, whiter neighborhoods. The gap can be attributed to several factors, including violence, diet, environmental hazards, substance abuse, and stress.

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Best Practices for Working with Medical Interpreters

By Megan Bedford on 6/14/18 9:44 AM

Address the patient, speak clearly, avoid jargon, and check for comprehension

If you’re a healthcare provider who works with some of the 25 million limited English proficient (LEP) patients in the U.S., you know how important interpretation is to successful patient outcomes. Poor communication increases the chance of medical errors with any patient, and LEP individuals are especially vulnerable in this regard.

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News Roundup | Week of June 8, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 6/8/18 3:27 PM

In this week's News Roundup:
  • Creating Financial Success at a Small Rural Hospital
  • Gender Bias Hinders Research in Chronic Disease
  • The Business Case for Racial Equity

Creating Financial Success at a Small Rural Hospital

An in-depth piece from Politico Magazine explores how a small, rural hospital in Kansas has become an economic powerhouse by serving the local refugee/immigrant population and specializing in labor and delivery. Ben Anderson, the hospital's CEO, relies on community partnerships, infrastructure grants, and targeted recruiting. His recruiting model is especially interesting: He attracts young physicians who are interested in helping Third World populations. "You can do that work right here in Kansas," he says. Having a staff that actively seeks to work with diverse populations improves patient experience and outcomes.

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News Roundup | Week of May 25, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 5/25/18 3:41 PM

In this week's News Roundup:
  • Health Equity Bill Introduced in Congress
  • Medical Schools Must Do More to Combat Racism
  • Experiment with Barbershop Clinics is Succeeding

Health Equity Bill Introduced in Congress

The Congressional Tri-Caucus, made up of the Congressional Asian Pacific American Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus, and Congressional Hispanic Caucus, has introduced the Health Equity and Accountability Act of 2018 (HEAA), a bill that attempts to address health disparities based on race and ethnicity. The authors note several reasons for these disparities, including language and cultural barriers to care.

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You Signed the #123forEquity Pledge. Now What?

By Megan Bedford on 5/24/18 10:20 AM

To date, 1,656 organizations, 51 state hospital associations, and 11 municipal hospital associations have signed onto the American Hospital Association's (AHA) #123forEquity Pledge to eliminate healthcare disparities. That means every state, and nearly 30% of our nation's hospitals, are represented in the movement to improve health equity. But the road between pledging good intention and effecting actionable change can be poorly marked, and dotted with unseen obstacles. In this post we'll review the key tenets of the AHA's Equity of Care Campaign, rationale for participation, and key actions hospitals and health systems can start to focus on today.

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Is Unconscious Bias Training Useful?

By Michele Courton Brown on 5/20/18 4:36 PM



Unconscious (or implicit) bias training is in the spotlight. From the #MeToo movement to the chorus of outrage over the unwarranted arrests of two black men at a Starbucks, companies are facing increasing public pressure to address the roots of discriminatory treatment.  But questions remain over whether bias training is an effective course of action, versus a perfunctory act taken to avoid bad press.

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News Roundup | Week of May 18, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 5/18/18 5:07 PM

In this week's News Roundup:
  • Near-Miss Mothers: For Every Woman Who Dies Post-Childbirth, Thousands More Come Close
  • Surging Opioid Overdose Rate in Latinos Tied to Language Barriers
  • More Transgender-Inclusive Healthcare is Essential

Near-Miss Mothers: For Every Woman Who Dies Post-Childbirth, Thousands More Come Close

The maternal mortality rates in the U.S. are grim, but the number of women who suffer postpartum complications that nearly cause death are even worse. For every woman who dies after childbirth, at least 70 come close. Some estimates put the number of women who suffer "severe maternal morbidity" at around 80,000 per year. A report by NPR/ProPublica finds that many of these complications are preventable, and there's a common theme that postpartum mothers don't feel their concerns are taken seriously by healthcare providers.

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News Roundup | Week of May 11, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 5/11/18 2:10 PM

In this week's News Roundup:
  • Unconscious Bias Training Can Ease Crisis in Black Maternal Mortality
  • Stigmatizing Language in Medical Records Affects Patient Care
  • Discrimination Causes Latinas to Be Less Satisfied with Contraception
  • Documentary Explores Desegregation of Healthcare System

Unconscious Bias Training Can Ease Crisis in Black Maternal Mortality

We've reported extensively on the dismal maternal mortality rates in the U.S., and the crisis in black maternal mortality in particular. A new piece by NBC News follows the stories of two black mothers who experienced serious complications with their deliveries. Both women felt their medical teams were dismissive and brusque, and that their health problems may have been avoided with better communication. They are among the 32% of black women who feel they’ve been discriminated against in physicians’ offices. Unconscious (or implicit) bias on the part of healthcare providers has very real consequences for patient outcomes. Bias training may not be the complete solution, but it is part of the solution, and should become a standard practice in all medical schools and healthcare organizations.

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News Roundup | Week of May 4, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 5/4/18 11:07 AM

In this week's News Roundup:

How Empathy Keeps People Out of the Hospital

Growing evidence shows that more empathetic care can keep people healthier and reduce hospital visits. A new piece by NPR's Marketplace profiles Philadelphia's Penn Center for Community Health Workers, which pairs community health workers with patients who frequent hospitals due to chronic illness, poverty, or mental health problems. The community health workers visit patients at their homes and help them navigate their health issues. The Penn Center makes an effort to match its staff with patients who share a similar background, in order to inspire trust. A randomized, controlled study showed the Center reduced hospitalizations by 30%.

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The Time Objection: Cross-Cultural Care and the Ever-Shortening Office Visit

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 5/1/18 8:38 AM

The most common objection

I've given hundreds of presentations on culturally-competent care to busy clinicians around the world. At the end of my talk, someone always asks the "time question." I know plenty of other clinicians are thinking it, but don’t want to appear insensitive. So I wait for a brave soul to say, “Dr. Green, you’re telling me that if I want to be culturally competent, I have to do all of these things on top of what I already have to cover? I have to ask my patients how they understand their condition? What their religious practices are? Whether they trust me? I’d love to—but I just don’t have time!”

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News Roundup | Week of April 27, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 4/27/18 12:21 PM

Asian Americans Undertreated for Mental Health Disorders

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How to Approach Medical Decision-Making Across Cultures

By Megan Bedford on 4/24/18 1:16 PM

How should important medical decisions be made?

If you've grown up in the U.S., you're probably familiar with the concept of a patient's "right to know." American culture holds that patients are entitled to be fully informed in their own medical care, including the decision-making process. In some cultures, however, autonomy in decision-making is not the norm. For many people, it is essential to involve (or even defer to) others, particularly family members, in important health decisions. In such families, it's common to look to an authority figure (determined by gender, position in the family, or level of acculturation) as the primary decision-maker within the group. In some cases, these families may wish to exclude the patient from decisions in order to avoid what is perceived as undue stress. This can cause friction between health providers, patients, and their relatives.

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News Roundup | Week of April 20, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 4/20/18 5:00 PM

Racial Bias Isn't Just a Problem at Starbucks

A video of two black men getting arrested at a Starbucks in Philadelphia has sparked widespread outrage directed at both Starbucks and the police. In response, Starbucks announced that it will close 8,000 stores in May so employees can engage in racial bias training. "While this is not limited to Starbucks, we're committed to being a part of the solution," said CEO Kevin Johnson. The problem certainly isn't limited to one company, or one industry, or one region of the country. There are any number of examples of white Americans calling the police on black Americans without real justification. Deeply ingrained and unconscious racial bias routinely leads to instant, often fear-based judgements about people that can have dire consequences. The question is, what can we do to break this cycle?  

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News Roundup | Week of April 13, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 4/13/18 9:41 PM

Unconscious Bias in Healthcare Impacts Bottom Line

Unconscious bias leads to health disparities for patients, and has a negative effect on healthcare workers as well. Unconscious bias can cause both patients and staff to be treated differently based on gender, race, language spoken, lifestyle choices, and more. This results in higher staff attrition and and lower patient satisfaction—and in turn, it negatively effects healthcare organizations' bottom line.

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News Roundup | Week of April 6, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 4/6/18 1:04 PM

We're Failing Dr. King's Legacy in Healthcare

This past week marked the 50th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s death. Dr. King famously said, "Of all the forms of inequality, injustice in health is the most shocking and inhumane." He said that in 1966. In 2018, the US still struggles with pervasive health inequality that weakens our overall healthcare system, and reduces our standing compared to other developed nations. The city of Atlanta, where Dr. King grew up and went to college, is a national healthcare hub, boasting world-class healthcare facilities. It is home to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), the American Cancer Society, the Arthritis Foundation, and several schools of medicine and public health. But Atlanta also has some of the widest gaps in black and white health outcomes in the country. Among these disparities are:

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News Roundup | Week of March 30, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 3/30/18 9:57 AM

Implicit Bias Controversy Based on Misunderstandings

Implicit bias, and especially the Implicit Association Test (IAT), has been the subject of recent debate in both scientific and popular press. Is the IAT accurate? Are its findings useful? Does the concept of implicit bias impede efforts to address explicit bias? A new piece in Scientific American argues that the controversy around implicit bias and the IAT is based on fundamental misunderstandings. For example, the IAT isn't designed to predict individual behavior, like how a particular physician will interact with a particular patient. Rather, the aggregate data can help predict (and correct) big-picture functions.

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3 Simple Ways to Alleviate Patient Mistrust

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 3/28/18 11:56 AM

Do your patients really trust you?

Trust in the healthcare system is at an all-time low—only 34% of Americans have “great confidence” in medical leaders, as compared to 73% in 1966. So if you are a health professional, you're wise to assume patient mistrust, rather than the other way around. Depending on your role and the setting, mistrust can present itself in very different ways. But I've learned that you can respond effectively to patient mistrust in any scenario using three simple communication techniques.

Topics: mistrust
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News Roundup | Week of March 23, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 3/26/18 7:13 PM

How to Improve Diversity in Clinical Trials

As reported in previous News Roundups, a lack of diversity in clinical trials results in disparities in care among under-served populations. Recruiting different racial and ethnic groups, especially African-Americans, remains a challenge. A focus-group study conducted by Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center sought to learn what it would take to address this problem. Results show that trust and communication are key to increasing minority participation in clinical trials.

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News Roundup | Week of March 16, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 3/16/18 4:43 PM

Want to Get People to See a Doctor? Target Their Beliefs

The Tsimane people are an isolated tribe in Bolivia with a life-expectancy of only 50 years. Researchers from the Integrated Anthropological Sciences Unit at UC Santa Barbara published a paper analyzing why the Tsimane often refuse medical care, even when it's free and offered by people they trust. Their findings provide insights into why so many people around the world, regardless of background and education, resist going to the doctor even when they know they should.

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Unconscious Bias in Healthcare

By Megan Bedford on 3/15/18 11:49 AM

 

What is unconscious bias?

Every moment, your brain processes incredible amounts of information. This processing allows you function: to make decisions and take actions. The majority of this goes on behind the scenes, a necessary efficiency that means you don’t have to “think” about most of your activity. For example, the minute calculations your brain makes to accomplish simple things, like walking across the room to open a door. Or more complicated things, like assessing a fellow human being.

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News Roundup | Week of March 9, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 3/9/18 3:42 PM

Cancer Screening Recommendations Put Nonwhite Women at Risk

In the United States, the recommended age for women to begin routine mammograms for cancer screening was recently increased to 50 years of age. This was based on a study of 747,763 mostly white women showing that breast cancer diagnoses peaked in their 60s. But researchers from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) have published a new study in JAMA Surgery that shows black, Hispanic, and Asian women tend to get breast cancer earlier than white women. A lack of data from racially diverse populations could put nonwhite women at risk for delayed diagnosis. According to David Chang, PhD, MBA, MPH, of the MGH department of surgery and an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School, "The situation with breast cancer is one of the best examples of how science done without regard to racial differences can produce guidelines that would be ultimately harmful to minority patients."

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News Roundup | Week of March 2, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 3/2/18 1:59 PM

Bias Impacts Research in Precision Medicine

Unconscious bias can lead to negative outcomes for disadvantage patient populations, even when that bias occurs behind-the-scenes in research settings. A new report from Data & Society identifies several ways that datasets can become biased, including historical bias, analytical bias, and access to different types of genetic data. “Bias through invisibility—such as lack of data on certain factors—can trigger discriminatory outcomes just as easily as explicitly problematic data,” note the authors.

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News Roundup | Week of February 23, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 2/23/18 1:16 PM


Physicians Feel Unequipped to Treat Transgender Patients

The transgender population is underserved by the healthcare system, and one reason may be provider hesitancy. To meet the medical needs of transgender people, healthcare organizations, together with medical schools and residency programs, must incorporate training and content on how to care for transgender patients.

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Do You Know About Your Hidden Bias? The IAT Can Help.

By Megan Bedford on 2/21/18 1:37 PM

 

In our live learning event Unconscious Bias in Medical Decision-Making, Quality Interactions co-founder Dr. Joseph Betancourt used data from the Implicit Association Test (IAT) to illustrate that nearly everyone has unconscious biases that impact our judgment and behavior. By nature of being unintended, or “unconscious,” it is essential to have a way to uncover our biases as a first step toward changing them. This is where the IAT comes in.

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News Roundup Week of February 16, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 2/16/18 10:53 AM

Medical Residents Lack Comprehensive Training in Cultural Competency

A report from the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) presents data from medical residency and fellowship programs, which shows that clinical learning environments (CLEs) vary widely in their application of strategies to address healthcare disparities. Among other findings, the data demonstrate a lack of comprehensive training in cultural competency.

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7 Questions You Have About Unconscious Bias, Answered by Dr. Betancourt

By Joseph Betancourt, MD, MPH on 2/15/18 11:55 AM

Last week our live learning event, Unconscious Bias in Medical-Decision Making, was attended by 225 organizations from 40 states in the U.S., Canada, and Switzerland. In this blog post, Dr. Joseph Betancourt responds to seven questions we didn't have time to answer during the event.

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News Roundup | Week of February 9, 2016

By Megan Bedford on 2/9/18 9:48 AM

Racial Bias Affects Trauma Outcomes

Dr. Adil Haider, a trauma surgeon at Harvard Medical School, has been studying disparities in emergency care outcomes for over 10 years. “People have always had this iconic image of emergency departments as the great equalizers,” Haider says. “There’s a perception that no matter who you are, if you have a trauma injury, you’re going to get picked up and receive the same level of care.” However, Dr. Haider's research identified large gaps in patient survival rates based on race. Compared to white patients with similar injuries, he found that black and Hispanic patients have a 20% and 50% greater chance of death, respectively. Socioeconomic factors, insurance status, and access to immediate emergency care all contribute to this disparity. But unconscious bias is also a likely culprit.

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News Roundup | Week of February 2, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 2/2/18 4:55 PM

New Report Links Black Maternal Mortality to Racial Bias

The Center for American Progress released a new report on the high death rates among black mothers and infants in the U.S. As previously reported here, black mothers die at at rate three to four times higher than white mothers, and infants born to black women die at twice the rate of those born to white women. The disparity is driving the country's overall maternal mortality rate, which is the worst in the developed world. This growing crisis can't be explained by socioeconomic factors. The report presents research showing that risk factors including income, education, and physical and mental health cannot account for the disparity in outcomes. Instead, the report points to systematic racial bias, including within the healthcare system. 

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News Roundup | Week of January 26, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 1/26/18 5:20 PM

Unconscious Bias Shielded Larry Nassar

The country was shocked this week by the sentencing of Dr. Larry Nassar, formerly the USA Gymnastics team doctor and an osteopathic physician at Michigan State University. Dr. Nassar confessed to serial child molestation after being accused of abusing at least 150 underage girls during his career. A piece in The Atlantic argues that Nassar's behavior was sheilded by the tendency of medical providers to doubt female pain. This tendency stems from unconscious bias that labels women as "hysterical," "emotional," and inherently less trustworthy than men. 

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News Roundup | Week of January 15, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 1/19/18 6:42 PM

Serena Williams's Birth Story Highlights Black Maternal Mortality Rates

Serena Williams's birth experience has added to the growing chorus of concern and outrage over black maternal mortality rates. In a cover story for Vogue, the tennis star describes her life-threatening post-birth complications. When she started to feel short of breath after her delivery, her concerns (based on a history of pulmonary embolisms) were initially dismissed by her caregivers.

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What Will It Take to End Perceived Discrimination in Healthcare?

By Megan Bedford on 1/16/18 11:38 AM


Perceived discrimination, based on race, gender, and other factors, causes patients to distrust the healthcare system and medical practitioners. They are then less likely to seek treatment, and less likely to follow through on medical advice. In response to a recent study on this topic, Quality Interactions co-founder Dr. Joseph Betancourt published an editorial in the Journal of General Internal Medicine (JGIM).The study, by Nguyen et al., found that rates of perceived discrimination in healthcare declined among black patients between 2008 and 2014. While this could be promising news, Dr. Betancourt argues that it is not time to celebrate yet.

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News Roundup | Week of January 8, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 1/12/18 3:55 PM

Stress Leads to Health Disparities Among Minority and Low-Income Populations

A report from the American Psycholological Association finds that lower-income and racial minority populations suffer more stress than affluent and white populations. This greater stress leads to disparities in mental and physical health, and shortens life expectancy.  According to Elizabeth Brondolo, PhD, chair of an APA working group that wrote the report, stress is "one of the top 10 social determinants of health inequities." The report recommends interventions to help ease the impact of stress on health, including improved communication between patients and caregivers.

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News Roundup | Week of January 1, 2018

By Megan Bedford on 1/5/18 10:52 AM

Unconscious Bias Impacts Non-White Maternal Health

In the U.S., black and brown women are more likely to experience medical complications in pregnancy than white women, and their babies are more likely to die or have serious health problems. This disparity is one reason why the U.S. has such high maternal and infant mortality rates compared with other developed countries.

As recent reporting shows (see past Roundups 12/4/17 and 12/18/17), this gap is rooted in healthcare providers' unconscious biases surrounding race and ethnicity, and cannot be explained by socioeconomic differences.

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News Roundup | Week of December 18, 2017

By Megan Bedford on 12/22/17 11:56 AM

Racism May Cause the Loss of Black Infants

In the U.S., black babies die at twice the rate of white babies. According to Arthur James, an OB-GYN at Wexner Medical Center at Ohio State University in Columbus, the majority of black infants that die are born premature, because black mothers have a higher risk of early labor. Research has shown that this gap can't be explained by poverty, education, or genetics. Around the world, women of similar economic and genetic histories routinely give birth to healthy, full-term babies. But there's something about growing up black in America that leads African-American mothers to have babies that are comparatively smaller and less healthy.

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News Roundup | Week of December 11, 2017

By Megan Bedford on 12/15/17 4:06 PM

Segregation Persists in Boston Healthcare

Boston is a renowned center for medicine and boasts several of the country's best and most trusted hospitals. But the city's black residents are less likely than white residents to receive treatment at the elite hospitals in the area. The Boston Globe's Spotlight Team investigated the disparity and found that part of it is due to geography: People tend to seek healthcare close to where they live. However, geography alone does not explain the disparities. While some factors are straightforward - such as the reality that lower-cost health plans often do not cover care at the city's academic medical centers - others are far more complex, based on perceptions of mistrust and bias, that are intertwined with Boston's complicated racial history.

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News Roundup | Week of December 4, 2017

By Megan Bedford on 12/8/17 3:34 PM

Black Women Are Dying In Childbirth Due to Unconscious Bias

Black women are far more likely than white women to die of childbirth-related complications—and the gap is widening. In fact, the disproportionate number of black maternal deaths in the U.S. is one of the reasons our overall maternal mortality rate is so high compared to countries with similar economies.

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News Roundup | Week of November 27, 2017

By Megan Bedford on 12/1/17 4:52 PM

Cultural Competency is a Pathway to Health Equity

In the United States, a person's access to quality healthcare can be affected by income, education, language barriers, and other obstacles. Health inequity impacts life expectancy and quality of life, and it places a financial burden on all tax payers. While many Americans are aware of this problem, it can be difficult to understand how health inequity comes about—and even harder to know how to address it.

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What Are Leading Organizations Doing to Achieve Health Equity?

By Megan Bedford on 9/28/17 1:07 PM

This has been a banner year for Moffitt Cancer Center, with five national distinctions honoring their steadfast commitment to equitable care, including recent recognition from the American Hospital Association (AHA) naming Moffitt an Equity of Care Award honoree.

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Case Study: Cross-Cultural Issues in Mental Health

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 8/24/17 1:47 PM

Maria Pérez is a 46 year-old woman, originally from the Dominican Republic, who reports to her primary care provider (PCP) because she has been feeling fatigued and dizzy for several months. Exploring this further, Mrs. Pérez acknowledges that she has also had trouble sleeping and has been feeling less "herself" lately. She has lost some weight.

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Case Study: Disability & Health Equity

By Alexander Green, MD, MPH on 8/2/17 2:30 PM

Gary Jenkins is a 71-year-old African American man who has always been able to manage his own affairs, despite being blind since birth. However, when he developed prostate cancer, he realized that he was at a major disadvantage.

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5 Tips for Working with Interpreters

By Kate Chai-Onn on 8/2/17 2:30 PM

Effective communication is essential to the healthcare interactions at all levels. When patients have limited-English proficiency (LEP), or speak different languages, it is nearly impossible for clear communication to take place. Interpreters provide an essential bridge to effective communication with LEP patients. However, simply having a qualified interpreter in the room (or on the phone) will not automatically guarantee success. Make the most of interpreter-mediated patient interactions with our five tips for working with interpreters.

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What is Health Literacy?

By Megan Bedford on 8/2/17 2:29 PM

Health literacy describes one's ability to obtain and understand the medical information needed to make informed healthcare decisions. This includes the ability to understand medical explanations of symptoms and illnesses; follow directions for medications, tests, and procedures; and ask relevant questions.

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